Kedgeree

We got a family present of smoked trout for the holidays, and we wanted a new recipe to use this scrumptious ingredient. We found just what we were looking for from Inga Witscher on her PBS program “Around the Farm Table.” The dish is called kedergree on the program, although the alternative spelling, kedgeree, seems more popular.

Kedgeree is thought to have originated as an Indian rice-and-bean or rice-and-lentil dish from the 14th century. The dish was brought to the United Kingdom by returning British colonials who had enjoyed it in India and it became a breakfast dish in Victorian times.

The dish can be eaten hot or cold. Haddock is the traditional fish for this dish, but others, such as tuna or salmon, can be substituted. Inga Witscher’s version called for smoked trout, so we tried it and loved it! (The other great part of this recipe is using up day-old cooked rice.)

The link to her recipe is here. Here is a copy of the recipe for those of you that can’t get that link to work. (We substituted half-and-half for the cream.)

Ingredients

About 4 cups of cooked white rice (It’s best to cook the rice the day before so it can dry out a bit and soak up all the butter and cream)
1 small yellow onion, diced
A stick of butter, give or take
1/2 cup cream
2 to 3 Tbsp curry powder, depending on your taste
8 ounces smoked trout, flaked into bite size pieces
4 hard boiled eggs
Salt and pepper to taste
Cilantro and lemons to garnish

Directions

1. Sweat the onion over medium heat, about 5 minutes. Add the rice and adjust the heat so the rice doesn’t burn. Slowly incorporate the butter one pat at a time until the rice mixture becomes creamy.

2. Stir in the curry powder. Add the cream and give it a good stir. Once the cream has been absorbed, mix in the trout and heat through.

3. Garnish the kedergree with heaps of cilantro, and slice the hard boiled eggs on the top. Serve with a lemon wedge.

Makes 4-6 servings

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