Mulligatawny Soup

Mulligatawny soup is a dish with origins in the southern part of India. The name comes from two words in the Tamil language meaning “pepper water.” The dish dates to the early days of the British colonial control of India. There are variations which use beef or lamb instead of chicken, as described here. Rice is usually used to thicken the soup.

This recipe comes from our friends John Edwards and Alison LaFrence.  John’s parents served as missionaries in India for many years.

1 chicken (about 4 lb.)

2 quarts water

2 tsp Accent

1 whole onion

2 celery stalks

3 Tbsp butter

1 clove garlic, crushed

⅔ cup rice, uncooked

1 cup chopped onions

1 cup diced carrots

¾ cup chopped celery

2 tsp sweet curry powder

4-8 chicken bouillon cubes

¼ tsp pepper

¼ cup cornstarch

½ cup milk

1 cup light cream

1 Tbsp parsley flakes

3 tsp salt

To cook chicken:

Place chicken, water, Accent, 2 tsp salt, whole onion, and celery stalks in large pot. Cover and simmer for 2½ hours or until chicken is tender. Be sure and bone while still warm for ease in removing meat. Strain broth and cool. Skim fat from top when broth has cooled.

To make soup:

Melt butter in large pot and saute garlic and rice until rice is straw-colored. Add the chopped onions, carrots and chopped celery. Saute for a few minutes. Do not allow rice to become too brown. Bring 10 cups of chicken broth to a boil and add vegetables. Season with bouillon, curry powder, remaining 1 tsp salt, and the pepper to taste. Simmer until rice is cooked, about 20 minutes. Add chicken, cut into bite-sized pieces. Blend cornstarch with ½ cup milk and add to soup. Cook and stir until thickened. Just before serving, add the cream.

If the water has boiled down and you need to add some water to equal 10 cups, simply add 1½ bouillon cubes for each cup needed.

Make about 4 quarts of soup. Freezes well.

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